MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print, 2014, newsprint installation: Eternal Misunderstandings in the Car Park, Troutman Street, Bushwick Open Studios; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved


MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print, 2014, newsprint installation: Eternal Misunderstandings in the Car Park, Troutman Street, Bushwick Open Studios; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved

  MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print, 2014, newsprint installation detail: Eternal Misunderstandings in the Car Park, Troutman Street, Bushwick Open Studios; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved


MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print, 2014, newsprint installation detail: Eternal Misunderstandings in the Car Park, Troutman Street, Bushwick Open Studios; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved

  MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print on bristol, 2014, installation: The Fisher Gallery, Horace Mann; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved


MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print on bristol, 2014, installation: The Fisher Gallery, Horace Mann; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved

  MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print, 2014, installation: Parsons School of Design; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved


MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print, 2014, installation: Parsons School of Design; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved

  MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print, 2014, installation: Parsons School of Design; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved


MARAT MAHAKALA, screen print, 2014, installation: Parsons School of Design; © 2016, Michael Kirk and Andrew Cornell Robinson, all rights reserved

 
MARAT MAHAKALA is a collaborative work with Andrew Cornell Robinson. Over the course of ten days a furious non-stop print process resulted in over 600 printings producing 240 prints. Two photographic portraits by Robinson of the artist and curator, Paul D’Agostino and 10 response drawings by Kirk were placed on 12 screens and in a fluid and facile manner the medium became the vehicle for drawing, painting and transfiguration.
— MK